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2020 Debate State Tournament
Debate Image Stenzel of Lakeville South wins Lincoln-Douglas crown;
Chang-Deutsch, Conry of Minneapolis South claim Policy title;
Swigert, Johnson of The Blake School earn Public Forum championship;
Foster of Eastview wins title in Congressional


Ending economic sanctions against Venezuela and encouraging states to eliminate their nuclear arsenals were two of the topics argued at the 2020 Debate State Tournament – the 119th edition and longest-running event of the Minnesota State High School League.

Logan Stenzel of Lakeville South claimed his first title in the Lincoln-Douglas competition. He defeated Steven Winnick of Forest Lake 7-0 in the final round. Stenzel’s argument against states eliminating their nuclear arsenals followed nine rounds of debate conducted over two days.

The results of eight rounds of debate proved that Gabe Chang-Deutsch and Clara Conry of Minneapolis South were the best policy debaters. Chang-Deutsch and Conry drew the affirmative argument, arguing for the United States to end its economic sanctions against Venezuela. They defeated Simon Jarcho and Isabel Kleckner of Minneapolis Washburn in the final round.

Chang-Deutsch fell in the quarterfinals with Eamon Howell last year. Jarcho was the defending champion. He won with Henry Braun in 2019.

Morgan Swigert and Jack Johnson of The Blake School took top honors in Public Forum. Their victory came after nine rounds of debate and they won 4-3 with a negative argument over Ryan Zhu and Arjan Maheshwari of Edina. Swigert and Johnson argued against the United States ending its economic sanctions against Venezuela.

Johnson lost with Thomas Gill in the 2019 quarterfinals. Zhu and Maheshwari also fell in last year’s quarterfinals.

Layla Foster of Eastview of Apple Valley won in Congressional debate. Defending champion Kelso Anderson of Hawley was the runner-up. Foster placed fifth in 2019. Congressional is a mock legislative assembly competition where students draft bills (proposed laws) and resolutions (position statements). Their peers then debate the legislation and vote whether or not to pass it into law. There were six rounds of Congressional debate, concluding with two Super Sessions on Saturday afternoon.

The Policy debate portion of the tournament has been conducted since 1902 and the Lincoln-Douglas portion of the tournament, which was an invitational event from 1986 through 1989, was added to the tournament in 1990. Public Forum was introduced in 2013 and Congressional was added in 2018. The 2020 tournament was held at the University of Minnesota.

Results are available at mshslstate.tabroom.com.
2019-20, 2020-21 Section Assignments
Competitive Section Assignments Image Below this message, you will find a link to the Competitive Section Assignments for 2019-20 & 2020-21 school years. The link will take you to a landing page where you will find the following:

Competitive Sections – There are 3 menus at the top that are universal to both the list and the map; 1. Activities, 2. Year, and 3. Schools. To view the section assignments for 2019-20 & 2020-21, make sure the year drop down menu in the middle says “2019-2020, 2020-2021”. You will need to click on the ‘+’ sign to expand any of the lists below to view all the schools within a section.
1. The Activities menu will allow you to see a list of all schools that are registered in that activity
2. The school menu will allow you to see where that school is listed in the activity you have selected.
3. If you leave the school the same and change activities to “Activities”. You will see a list of all the activities that the school is registered for and what section they are in.
4. You can drill down even more if you want to look at a section or class in an activity be using the controls just underneath the drop-down menus.

Section Map – The same menus and control listed above are also available on the map.
1. Select an activity first and make sure 2019-2020, 2020-2021 is selected in the year menu.
2. You can find a school by selecting it in the “School” Menu. It will show on the map with all the locations of the schools in that section. The school you selected shows larger than others.
3. Note that the school locations have a number on them. This identifies the classification not the section.
4. Section locations are hosted on the side of the maps. The number indicates how many are in each section and is located above the number of the section
5. You can drill down even more if you want to look at a certain section in a class by using the controls below the menus at the top.
6. One additional control on the map is the “Show Coop Teams”. By selecting this you will see additional schools that are in a coop but not the Host School. You will also notice gray arrows starting with the host school and pointing to each additional school in the coop.


Competitive Section Assignments


The End Of An Era As Ron Stolski Retires From Coaching
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 1/22/2020
Listening to Ron Stolski speak, I have been brought nearly to tears on three occasions. The third time was during a Wednesday afternoon phone call. This was a few hours after word of Stolski's retirement following 58 years as a high school head football coach came via Tweet by former Brainerd Dispatch sports editor Mike Bialka, who himself retired a year ago.

Stolski's record is well-known around Minnesota. Fifty-eight years as a head coach, the last 45 at Brainerd; he ranks second in all-time football victories and coached longer than anyone else in Minnesota.

He informed Brainerd athletic director Charlie Campbell of his plans in December, and Stolski, 80, told me he was "98 percent" sure at that point. Once he had settled on retirement, he called a players meeting Wednesday morning. The only other people there were assistant coaches Chet Stevenson and Scott Parsons, who also chose to retire. Stevenson played for Stolski at Princeton and Parsons did the same at Park Center; Chet was on the Brainerd coaching staff for 44 years, Scott for 42.

As the kids gathered, Stolski asked them to turn off their cell phones because he didn’t want them to spread the news via text and social media; he had promised Bialka that he would have that privilege once the meeting ended.

He told the young Warriors, “I promised that I wouldn’t have tears today. But I never trusted a man who couldn’t cry.”

Through his tears, the coach talked to his now former players about the football program’s history, what it was like when Stolski came to Brainerd in 1975, and how the story flowed from there.

“I said, ‘Your job now is to continue the legacy that is Warrior football. Be good teammates, be good friends, be good sons and someday be good fathers and good husbands.’ I told them I was most proud of the number of people that played for us and are now in the trades; construction, surgeons, preachers, teachers, doctors. I said, ‘That’s your goal.’ ”

I was unable to speak for a few seconds listening to the old coach talk over the phone. I gathered myself and told him that I was on the verge of tears. I think he was, too.

The first time Stolski had that affect on me came long ago, probably 15 or 20 years back. I was in the Warriors locker room before a home game. The room was crowded as the players sat on benches and stood in front of lockers. A white board served as a background as assistant coaches focused on offense, defense and special teams offered their final instructions before the head coach took over the room.

And man, could he take over the room. Stolski began talking in a calm voice, reminding the boys -- boys who today are adult men -- of who they were and the legacy they represented. His voice rose as he talked about all the hard work, all the preparation, all the pride involved in that night’s endeavor. The volume began to climb as he hollered, “One heartbeat!” … meaning the team must play as one on this beautiful autumn evening.

And now, the boys were standing, hooting and hollering, filing out of the locker room, heading for a decades-old stairway on a hill that overlooks the field, steps on which a million Warriors cleats had gone downhill and back up for every practice and game. Now, Stolski was giving it all he had, yelling, “Relentless! Relentless! Relentless!”

The second time Stolski had this effect on me came in the first game of the 2019 season. The Warriors opened what would be Stolski’s final season at Elk River.

As I got out of my car a couple hours before kickoff, Stolski was walking from the locker room in the school out to the field. We shook hands and chatted, as we have done countless times over the years. It was a cool, breezy night … rare for Week 1 of the football season in Minnesota.

I hadn’t even asked the “retirement” question before Ron said he had no such plans. He said, “I don’t feel like I’m 80,” adding what he had told me several times in prior years; as long as he felt like he was doing good things for kids, he would stay on the job.

After the Brainerd and Elk River teams completed their warmups, the Warriors gathered behind one end zone for their final instructions. Again, assistant coaches talked about offense, defense and special teams. Then it was the head coach’s turn.

He spoke in that strong, familiar voice, the decibels steadily climbing, “We’ve talked about some past teams, the 2017 team, the 2010 team that stopped Eden Prairie on the 3 in the playoffs. Listen! It’s your story now! One day, God willing, somebody will be telling the story of you! A coach will stand up and say, ‘Let me tell you about the Warriors of 2019!’

“Play clean. Play sharp. Rattle the pads. It’s going to be a beautiful journey. I envy you. Tonight, we stand as one.”

As the team returned to the field, I shook Stolski’s hand with misty eyes. I said, “Coach, I love to listen when you talk to your kids.” He smiled and said, “And I never write anything down.”

After the news came out Wednesday, I asked Charlie Campbell, who has been the activities director in Brainerd for nine years, what he will remember most about Stolski 10 years from now. The question seemed to catch him off guard

“Oh, John. This is hard,” he said. “Wow.”

“Ron is just so wise. His heart was always in the right place. The experience of the kids always mattered. And I think coaches, administrators and school people have learned a lot from Ron. And I think 10 years from now, we could still learn a lot from Ron.”

Stolski has many good friends, of course. One of the closest is a man named Steve Nunnink. He coached with Stolski, specializing in strength training, in the early 1970s at Park Center and came to Brainerd with him. Steve, who was the national high school strength coach of the year in 2001, suffered a massive brain trauma on the sideline during the 2003 season opener.

Stolski visits Steve and his wife, Randi, often. Some days are better than others for Steve as far as being able to communicate. When Stolski was finalizing his decision to retire, he visited the Nunninks.

“I probably talked to Steve for an hour and he probably didn’t hear anything,” Ron said. “He’s been my inspiration forever.”

Two days later, Randi called and said Steve was having a good day. So Stolski went back to the Nunninks and said to his friend, "Stephen, our work here is done. Steve waited a minute and he asked, ‘Why?’ I said we’ve done what we set out to do, Steve. Forty-five years ago we set out to create a good program and do good things for people. He said, ‘No.’ I broke down. He thinks we’re still coaching together. I asked him why he said no and he said, ‘Because the kids need you.’ ”

As we continued our emotional conversation, Ron said this: “When we choose a life in teaching and coaching, we choose to help those we come in contact with. My computer is going crazy with messages from former players. This will be hard for a few days.”

--Follow John on Twitter @MSHSLjohn, listen to "Preps Today with John Millea” wherever you get podcasts and hear him on Minnesota Public Radio.



More of John's Journal
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MSHSL Behavior Expectations
December Board of Directors Agenda
Board Workshop Agenda 10-14-19
MAAA Executive Secretary
Oct 2019 Board and Committee Mtg Agendas
MSHSL 2019-2020 Media Policy Manual
Concussion Insurance Program Guide
Show Older News Items
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2019-20 AED Order Information
2019-20 Online Rules Meeting Deadlines
2019-20, 2020-21 Activity Classification
2019-20, 2020-21 Classification Method
2019-20, 2020-21 School Enrollment-Alpha
2019-20, 2020-21 School Enrollments
2019-20, 2020-21 Section Assignments
Advisory Recommendation Forms
Concussion Insurance Program Guide
Uniform Modification-Special Recognition
Weather Conditions and Competition
 


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